Dangers of Copying Someone Else’s Formula for Success

Article by The Global Spiritualists Association

“Why can’t I just copy someone else’s formula for success?” This is a question that many new business owners have. It seems like it would work and in many cases it does. But if you take this path, then you won’t learn the important and specific lessons that you need to learn in order to stay in the game for the long term.

You see, many people get an idea for a new startup and they raise some cash. They get excited and hire some people. Within just a few years, their company goes under. This happens too often but The Global Spiritualists Association has people and materials that can help with this problem.

There’s nothing sadder than seeing someone spend their whole life in a job where they aren’t completely fulfilled though. When you set out to follow someone else’s formula for success, then you can wind up working in an area that’s not right for you. And that is the greatest danger of trying to copy someone’s success.

Follow your own path. Forge your own personal course. Along the way, you’ll discover many unique things about yourself. You’ll build the character and practical skills to excel.

The journey to success is often just as significant as reaching your destination. You become the person you were meant to be along the way if you follow your own path. If you follow someone else’s path though, you may find that you try to force yourself to be or do certain things.

Founded in 1999 by Zhang Xinyue, The Global Spiritualists Association works with startups and established companies helping them move forward in the right direction. They provide mentoring, courses and advice that help business owners meet the tough challenges of today’s business world.

Business leaders that Meditate

Article by The Global Spiritual Association
Here is a list of a few business leaders that have contributed their success to meditation.

Ariana Huffington

The CEO of the Huffington Post, Ariana Huffington, has practiced meditation techniques since she was just a teenager. She has been a very vocal advocate of meditation, even saying that meditation has played a massive role in her success.

One of the best quotes about mindfulness comes from the CEO herself: “Meditation is not about stopping thoughts, but recognizing that we are more than our thoughts and our feelings.”

Jeff Weiner

Weiner, the former executive of Yahoo, and currently known better as the current CEO of LinkedIn. In his schedule, he usually likes to take time out of his daily plan to practice meditation. In an interview, Weiner said that this gives him time to think and improve his empathy and compassion, positively impacting his productivity.

Pat Flynn, mostly known for being an online entrepreneur, makes six net profit figures every month. At first, he explained how he was first pretty skeptical of meditation. But he took the change and decided to try it out for himself and learned how much it was able to help him manage an overwhelming amount of tasks and responsibilities.

Russell Simmons

Not your most typical CEO, but Def Jam records the co-founder is a firm believer in meditation. He believes that meditation has been one of the most important factors of his entire career. In a recent interview, Simmons spoke up about meditation, “You have to learn to love yourself enough to take care of yourself. Sometimes if you’re lucky, you get a chance to change your life.”

Joe Rogan

Despite the tough sports persona he plays as a UFC host and the host of the Joe Rogan Show podcast, Joe Rogan is a very vocal advocate of meditation. His podcast platform allowed him to influence and encourage thousands of people to try the practice of meditation. Rogan stated that meditation has had an enormous impact on his career, health, and success. Rogan says it improves his ability to focus on various projects with a clear-headed approach.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.